Authors

  • Mitch Keamy Photo Mitch Keamy is an anesthesiologist in Las Vegas Nevada Andy Kofke Photo Andy Kofke is a Professor of Neuro-anesthesiology and Critical Care at the University of Pennslvania Mike O'Connor Mike O'Connor is Professor of Anesthesiology and Critical Care at the University of Chicago Rob Dean Photo Rob Dean is a cardiac anesthesiologist in Grand Rapids Michigan, with extensive experience in O.R. administration.

« The Nature of Anesthesia Judgment | Main | Sleep and Death are Brothers... »

Comments

Bongi

fascinating. where i come from only once in my training was an anaesthetist called for a resus (code) outside theater. that very very junior surgeon did not continue much longer in surgery. i can't imagine needing to call an anaesthetist for anything other than to dope. however the type of anaesthetist you describe would be very welcome to me.

mkeamy

Bongi, thanks for visiting the site. As the mechanics of administering anesthesia have become less of a juggling act (gas monitors, advanced pharmacology, pulse oximeters) it has freed up the attention of a good anesthesiologist to expand his/her attention to ever bigger perspectives regarding the ongoing medical care of the surgical patient; we were trained to consider ourselves the surgeon's partner, not just his help, and we strove (and still strive) to be worthy of our own self-image. Thanks for commenting

Mitch

fingertip pulse oximeter

i can't imagine needing to call an anaesthetist for anything other than to dope.

Verify your Comment

Previewing your Comment

This is only a preview. Your comment has not yet been posted.

Working...
Your comment could not be posted. Error type:
Your comment has been posted. Post another comment

The letters and numbers you entered did not match the image. Please try again.

As a final step before posting your comment, enter the letters and numbers you see in the image below. This prevents automated programs from posting comments.

Having trouble reading this image? View an alternate.

Working...

Post a comment

Your Information

(Name and email address are required. Email address will not be displayed with the comment.)

Blog powered by Typepad